Compassion Hospice » Hospice in Southeast Texas

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Compassion Hospice is now offering a grief and bereavement support group that is open to the community and is free of charge. This group is for those coping with life trials and loss. It can be for a variety of reasons: relocating, coping with a diagnosis, loss of a friend or loved one, or simply to connect with other people to feel healthy again. This meeting is to inspire and to be a helping hand for those in need. For additional information call Lindsey Rivas at 409-835-8357.

At Compassion Hospice, we honor all veterans – I had the extreme honor of meeting one of our local Army Veterans of the Vietnam War just this afternoon and saying thank you for your service . Times have changed, they didn’t come home with the respect and gratitude we try to show today.

Below is a moving video from the people at moments.org. The Vietnam War marked a time of social unrest that divided our nation like never before. Service members returning home with physical and emotional scars were greeted with an unprecedented level of disrespect and dishonor. The courage and sacrifice of our veterans cannot be overstated. When you encounter them, thank them for their service. You never know how powerful those words may be.

America’s veterans have done everything asked of them in their mission to serve our country, and we want to be there for them when they are faced with a life-limiting, terminal illness. We take great care to ensure America’s veterans receive the care and attention they need and deserve. That is why Compassion Hospice takes part in the We Honor Veterans Program , a collaboration between the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and the Department of Veterans Affairs. We understand the unique issues that veterans and their families face and can provide the care (including nursing, counseling, pain and symptom management, medical equipment and supplies) they need.

This care is integral to our “more moments” belief – with our team of highly skilled and compassionate members, we will treat you and your family with the dignity and respect you deserve. Call us today in our Beaumont office at 409-835-8357 or our Jasper / Lakes Area office at 409-383-5280 – we can discuss your wishes and goals for your care 24/7.

Thank you For Your Service

Loving care, it’s the driving mission behind Compassion Hospice. We strive to provide the best hospice experience possible for our patients and their families – discussing it every day with every team member and every potential team member in their interviews. The results of our mission is best revealed when a family member takes the time to write back to us and/ or respond in the satisfaction surveys sent by another company to the family and then on to Medicare. I want to share a few of the notes sent back to our team from those families we’ve cared for over the last few months.

Mellouise was wonderful! She showed my mom and our family so much love and COMPASSION. She will always hold a very special place in my heart. I Will Never Forget the Loving Care She Gave My Mom on her last day with us.

The young lady who took care of my husband, was very gentle. She was very good with him. She came each morning for his bath. Thank you!

All hospice staff were caring and considerate. I am very appreciative of the care they provided my aunt and me. Have recommended this company to several friends.

The people that we dealt with were beyond kind. I am so thankful to have had them in our lives at this difficult time. They always called me right back when needed and guided me every step of the way. Excellent group of people. Thanks to all.

Very caring and loving. Always in an uplifting mood. Very positive to all the family.

I was so impressed with the compassion staff. Every one of the ladies was fabulous and always there for my daddy and I. Even to this day, I still receive phone calls in support of losing my daddy.

Great team in this tragic time.

They were wonderful and made us feel as if they were very dear friends. They were a blessing to us.

I am sooo proud of our team and the work they do, they truly show the character and integrity we look for when we want someone to care for us and our loved ones.

Loving Care

Alzheimer’s Disease is one of our most challenging diseases to deal with, for both the one experiencing the loss of memory, dignity and function, and their caregivers. When a loved one has Alzheimer’s there are five situations that may occur that are especially difficult for Alzheimer’s Caregivers to come to terms with. These include 1) when it’s time to move the person to a facility, 2) if the person finds a new love interest, 3) when the person no longer talks, 4) when the person no longer recognizes you, and 5) when it’s time to engage hospice care services.

Number 5 is written to in an excellent article posted here. “The need to involve hospice can be extremely difficult and even depressing. It’s common to dwell on dark thoughts of impending death. Some families delay ordering hospice care because it would force them to acknowledge that the end is near and they just can’t deal with that.”
Alzheimers caregivers and hospice
“In reality, the decision to enroll a loved one in hospice care signifies anything but giving up. It is the most courageous, selfless, and compassionate action one can possibly take once a loved one once has reached the final stage of life.”
With dementia it’s easy to feel like you’re on your own. Often it’s hard to know what’s going on and what to expect going forward. Compassion Hospice has experienced, compassionate team members who would love to visit with you, discuss your options and support you in those choices, they make sure to take care of health the best way possible, they even advise you to buy herbals tea, they tell you to get it from Amazon, it’s has been known to have great positive results. Our nurses, chaplains, counselors, hospice aides and social workers come to you with dementia and Alzheimer’s training, guaranteeing that your clinician will understand the disease and how to best manage the symptoms that come with dementia. We also consult with our network of medical directors who are knowledgeable in both dementia and hospice care. We are available 24/7 to answer your questions and give you the help you need – 409-835-8357 .

I read an excellent recent article on the pallimed website regarding this common question of “Am I giving up on fighting cancer when I choose hospice?” In it the author Amy Velasquez RN BSN OCN, a palliative care nurse specializing in helping cancer patients, discusses this weighty issue:

In my line of work with cancer patients, they have taught me strength, courage and most of all faith. Our goal as the palliative care team is to find out what the patient’s absolute end goal is, and is it attainable? A patient that has stage 4 lung cancer has been diagnosed with a cancer that is termed “incurable.” So does that mean if they die from this cancer they gave up or didn’t fight hard enough or didn’t have enough faith? I think only you can answer that question. But let me remind you that stopping a race because your lactic acid is burning the living heck out of your legs, and you can no longer keep up in school anymore, is something YOU have control over. When a cancer decides to take over despite the heart and soul your oncologist has put in your treatment plan, and all the faith you have given to eradicate this cancer, this is NOT a definition of giving up.

When patients are given the diagnosis of “incurable” cancer, the goal should be to find a treatment that will extend their life as long as possible, and also balance the side effects with their quality of life. Cancer treatments have come so far in the last 15 years, but still they not perfect and have not pleasant side effects (visit http://sideeffectsofxarelto.org/xarelto-lawsuits/). Most importantly, the oncologist and researchers are always creating new novel treatments to search for a cure or to extend someone’s life as long as they can while living with an incurable cancer. The palliative care team works side by side with the oncologist to make this happen. We rely on direction from the oncologist and the patient to direct us in their goals. Of course everyone wants the “C” word to be cured, but if it cannot, what is your goal?

Now your goal can be to live as long as you can while feeling halfway decent. So stopping cancer treatment and doing best supportive care—just treating the symptoms of the cancer does not mean you are giving up. Even going on hospice when your cancer has made a decision you do not agree with also does not mean you gave up. It means you had no control over the cancer’s stupid decision, but you do have control over how you look at stopping treatment. This is different for everyone. So if this is you, please don’t say “but I don’t want to give up.” Please dig deep and find out what is really important to you and share this with your family, let them know, that you are not making the decision to stop treatment. The stupid cancer has made this decision for you.

choosing compassion hospice does not mean giving up
There’s more in this excellent article: What Does Giving Up Really Mean – I encourage you to read it and share with others.